LAW FALSE CONFESSION/ JAIL FABRICATED CONFESSIONS/ A factitious disorder/T3/GANSER SYNDRONE/BLUE DIAPER SYNDROME /OTHER ISSUES OPEN FOR PUBLIC TO READ JAN 9 2020
Submitted by Unregistered User on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 15:49

LAW FALSE CONFESSION/ JAIL FABRICATED CONFESSIONS/ A factitious disorder/T3/GANSER SYNDRONE/BLUE DIAPER SYNDROME /OTHER ISSUES OPEN FOR PUBLIC TO READ JAN 7 2020
Submitted by Unregistered User on Tue, 01/07/2020 - 21:45
A false confession is an admission of guilt for a crime for which the confessor is not responsible. False confessions can be induced through coercion or by the mental disorder[1] or incompetency of the accused. Research has demonstrated that false confessions occur on a regular basis in case law. Juveniles have a significantly higher rate of false confessions than do adults.
This is one reason why jurisprudence has established a series of rules—called "confession rules"—to detect, and subsequently reject, false confessions. Plea agreements typically require the defendant to stipulate to a set of facts establishing that he/she is guilty of the offense. For example, in the United States federal system, before the court enters judgment on a guilty plea, it must determine that there is a factual basis for the plea.[2]
Causes[edit]
False confessions can be categorized into three general types, as outlined by American Saul M. Kassin in an article for Current Directions in Psychological Science:[3][4]
• Voluntary false confessions are those that are given freely, without police prompting. Sometimes they may be sacrificial, to divert attention from the actual person who committed the crime. For instance, a parent might confess to save their child from jail. In some cases, people have falsely confessed to having committed notorious crimes simply for the attention that they receive from such a confession. In that vein, approximately 60 people are reported to have confessed to the 1947 murder of Elizabeth Short in Los Angeles, who was known as the "Black Dahlia" in a spectacular case.[5]
• Compliant false confessions are given to escape a stressful situation, avoid punishment, or gain a promised or implied reward. An example of a stressful situation is the typical setting of a police interrogation; these are often conducted in stark rooms with no windows or objects other than a table and two chairs. For suspects, the room becomes reality, and this creates serious mental exhaustion for the individual being questioned. After enough time, suspects may confess to crimes they did not commit in order to escape what feels like a helpless situation. Interrogation techniques, such as the Reid technique, try to suggest to the suspect that they will experience a feeling of moral appeasement if they choose to confess. Material rewards such as coffee or the cessation of the interrogation are also used to the same effect. People may also confess to a crime they did not commit as a form of plea bargaining in order to avoid the risk of a harsher sentence after trial. People who are easily coerced are known to score high on the Gudjonsson suggestibility scale and are highly vulnerable to making false confessions.
• Internalized false confessions are those in which the person genuinely believes that they have committed the crime, as a result of highly suggestive interrogation techniques.
Effects[edit]
False confessions greatly undermine the due process rights of the individual who has confessed. As Justice Brennan noted in his dissent in Colorado v. Connelly,[10]
"Our distrust for reliance on confessions is due, in part, to their decisive impact upon the adversarial process. Triers of fact accord confessions such heavy weight in their determinations that 'the introduction of a confession makes the other aspects of a trial in court superfluous, and the real trial, for all practical purposes, occurs when the confession is obtained.' No other class of evidence is so profoundly prejudicial. 'Thus the decision to confess before trial amounts in effect to a waiver of the right to require the state at trial to meet its heavy burden of proof.'"
Coerced false confessions have been used for directly political purposes. The systematic use of coerced confessions of political prisoners to extract public recantations for propaganda purposes has occurred in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century in Stalin's Soviet Union, Maoist China and, most recently, the Islamic Republic of Iran.[11]
Coerced[edit]
Fabricated jailhouse confessions[edit]
These are confessions given by prisoners to other inmates while in custody. "Jailhouse informants who recount their fellow prisoners' 'confessions' are often used by the state as witnesses in criminal prosecutions. It has recently become public knowledge that such confessions are easily fabricated."[49]
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A factitious disorder is a condition in which a person, without a malingering
Factitious disorder imposed on self (Munchausen syndrome)Factitious disorder imposed on another
Ganser syndrome
Somatic symptom disorders, though also diagnoses of exclusion, are characterized by physical complaints that are not produced intentionally.[2]
from somatic symptom disorder (formerly called somatization disorder
Factitious T3-induced hyperthyroidism
The thyroid gland produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). ... When this occurs because the prescribed dosage of hormone medicine is too high, it is called iatrogenic, or doctor-induced, hyperthyroidism. Factitious hyperthyroidism can also occur when someone takes too much thyroid hormone on purpose.May 15, 2018
medlineplus.gov › ency › article
Factitious hyperthyroidism: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia
Thyrotoxicosis factitia (alimentary thyrotoxicosis, exogenous thyrotoxicosis)[1][2] refers to a condition of thyrotoxicosis caused by the ingestion[3] of exogenous thyroid hormone.[4][5] It can be the result of mistaken ingestion of excess drug, such as levothyroxine[6] and triiodothyronine,[7] or as a symptom of Munchausen syndrome. It is an uncommon form of hyperthyroidism.
Patients present with hyperthyroidism and may be mistaken for Graves’ disease, if TSH receptor positive, or thyroiditis because of absent uptake on a thyroid radionuclide uptake scan due to suppression of thyroid function by exogenous thyroid hormones.[8] Ingestion of thyroid hormone also suppresses thyroglobulin levels helping to differentiate thyrotoxicosis factitia from other causes of hyperthyroidism, in which serum thyroglobulin is elevated. Caution, however, should be exercised in interpreting thyroglobulin results without thyroglobulin antibodies, since thyroglobulin antibodies commonly interfere in thyroglobulin immunoassays causing false positive and negative results which may lead to clinical misdirection. In such cases, increased faecal thyroxine levels in thyrotoxicosis factitia may help differentiate it from other causes of hyperthyroidism
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Submitted by Unregistered User on Tue, 01/07/2020 - 21:46
lab work information thyroid and liver and other types and factitious t3 hyerthyroidism blue diaper syndrome dec 29 2019 9PM open for public to read Submitted by Unregistered User on Mon, 12/30/2019 - 03:23 Factitious T3-induced hyperthyroidism The thyroid gland produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). ... When this occurs because the prescribed dosage of hormone medicine is too high, it is called iatrogenic, or doctor-induced, hyperthyroidism. Factitious hyperthyroidism can also occur when someone takes too much thyroid hormone on purpose.May 15, 2018 medlineplus.gov › ency › article Factitious hyperthyroidism: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia Thyrotoxicosis factitia (alimentary thyrotoxicosis, exogenous thyrotoxicosis)[1][2] refers to a condition of thyrotoxicosis caused by the ingestion[3] of exogenous thyroid hormone.[4][5] It can be the result of mistaken ingestion of excess drug, such as levothyroxine[6] and triiodothyronine,[7] or as a symptom of Munchausen syndrome. It is an uncommon form of hyperthyroidism. Patients present with hyperthyroidism and may be mistaken for Graves’ disease, if TSH receptor positive, or thyroiditis because of absent uptake on a thyroid radionuclide uptake scan due to suppression of thyroid function by exogenous thyroid hormones.[8] Ingestion of thyroid hormone also suppresses thyroglobulin levels helping to differentiate thyrotoxicosis factitia from other causes of hyperthyroidism, in which serum thyroglobulin is elevated. Caution, however, should be exercised in interpreting thyroglobulin results without thyroglobulin antibodies, since thyroglobulin antibodies commonly interfere in thyroglobulin immunoassays causing false positive and negative results which may lead to clinical misdirection. In such cases, increased faecal thyroxine levels in thyrotoxicosis factitia may help differentiate it from other causes of hyperthyroidism. PTH deficiency Liver Function Tests (L.F.T.) Test: BSP, Bromsulphalein Test Test: Serum Bilirubin Test: Alkaline Phosphatase Test: SGOT, SGPT, LDH Definition: These enzymes are used to help diagnose liver disease (also MI, refer to previous chapter). SGPT - Serum Glutamic Pyruvic Transaminase normal: 5-35 U/ml (highest levels seen in liver disease) SGOT - Serum Glutamic Oxaloacetic Transaminase normal: 5-40 U/ml Test: Blood Ammonia level of ammonia in the plasma Normal Values: 3.2 - 4.5 g/dl (depends upon the method used) Thyroid Function Tests Introduction: As most nurses know, the thyroid affects the following in our bodies: 1. body metabolism and the amount of oxygen consumed 2. speed of chemical reactions in the body 3. amount of heat produced in the body 4. Test: BMR, Basal Metabolism Rate 5. Normal Values: + 5% probably means slightly overactive thyroid - 5% probably means underactive thyroid 6. Test: PBI, Protein Bound Iodine Measures the amount of iodine in serum 7. Test: Radioactive Iodine Uptake (RAI) (RAIU)( uses I131) 8. Test: Thyroidal Iodide Clearance 9. This test measures the amount of iodine cleared by the blood in a period of time. 10. Test: Radioactive Iodine Excretion 11. Pancreatic Enzymes 12. Test: Pancreatic Enzymes: Amylase 13. Test: Pancreatic Enzyme: Lipase triiodothyronine (T3) and tetraiodothyronine (T4 (T3RU-------- Free T4 index (FT4I), derived from the T4 and T3RU--------------(TSH------------ serum thyroid binding globulin (TBG) to identify hormone binding disorders---------- a free T3------------ Free T4--- The most useful of these is the TSH releasing hormone (TRH) challenge wherein TSH is measured before and after TRH infusion------ anilino-l-naphthaline sulfuricacid (ANS-----)-----125I-T4------12(5 ((I-labeled T3. The 125I-T3 partitions between solid-phase resin binder and serum binding sites, and at the end of the incubation the supernatant serum is removed. The 125I-T3 activity remaining on the resin binder divided by total 125I-T3 added and then multiplied by 100 defines percentage RU)----- ----- RU---- T3RU--------------(FT4I )------ 125I-T4----------( called There is in general an excellent correlation between zero values of TSH and TRH-TSH nonresponsiveness d T3 toxicosis-------)------ flat TRF---- T3RIA with nontoxic nodular goiters, patients recently treated for thyrotoxicois, patients with "euthyroid" Graves" disease or exophthalmous, normal subjects in the first trimester of pregnancy, and patients with pituitary or hypothalomic hypothyroidis////////////// in renal failure, whereas others are severely ill with a variety of nonthyroidal diseases/////////////////////// table 142.3Thyroid Function Studies in Hyperthyroidism Usually high: T4, T3 resin uptake, free T4 index, free T4 , T3 , 131I uptake Low TSH, TRH-TSH response   Hyperthyroid Graves" disease   Hyperthyroid Hashimoto's disease   Toxic multinodular goiter   Hyperfunctioning follicular adenoma   Thyroid cancer  Low 131I uptake   Lymphocytic thyroiditis with spontaneously resolving hyperthyroidism   Subacute thyroiditis   Struma ovarii   Iodide-induced hyperthyroidism   Factitious T4-induced hyperthyroidism  High TSH   TSH-secreting pituitary tumor  High HCG    Embryonal carcinoma of testis   Hydatiform mole High T3 , 131I uptake; normal T4, T3 resin uptake, free T4 index, free T4 Low TSH, TSH response to TRH  "T3 toxicosis"   Graves" disease   Toxic multinodular goiter   Hyperfunctioning follicular adenoma  Low 131I uptake, low T4    Factitious T3-induced hyperthyroidism PTH deficiency _______________________________________________________________________ Blue diaper syndrome/ Zellweger syndrome/ Red Diaper Syndrome/ Pink Diaper Syndrome/ Breastfeeding MedicineVol. 13, No. 5Case ReportFree Access/Serratia marcescens Colonization Causing Pink Breast Milk and Pink Diapers: A Case Report and Literature Review/Abstract/Introduction:Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen and common cause of infectious outbreaks in pediatric units, leading to both significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. Environmental and some clinical strains may produce a characteristic red pigment, prodigiosin. Colonization can hence turn breast milk and fecally-soiled diapers pink, which can lead otherwise unaffected patients to present to their physicians and also interrupt breastfeeding. No clear guidance exists regarding the outpatient management of breastfeeding mothers and infants colonized with S. marcescens.//// urate crystals from katrineelizabethsackett32463whitelady(5'3)(5'2 1/2) spring terrace apts 7101 n ih 35 Austin texas near dennys restaurant and by burger king and near st john street and ih-35 in Austin tx dec 29 sunday 2019 look under google to find information

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