What Is 'Mudding'? Is It Legal?
By Andrew Lu on April 3, 2013 9:09 AM
The recent death of MTV's "Buckwild" star Shain Gandee has thrust "mudding" into the spotlight. Many people are now wondering just what is mudding and whether mudding is legal.
Generally, mudding involves driving an all-terrain vehicle or sport utility vehicle off-road through wet fields, streams, lakeshores, lakebeds, or other muddy areas, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Individuals who go mudding generally race through these areas, spinning their tires and throwing mud.
In the process, they also may rip up vegetation, create unsightly holes, and destroy property. So is mudding legal?
Generally speaking, mudding is not illegal in and of itself. For example, there are no laws that provide that someone shall never drive in a muddy area.
However, there are laws and regulations that prohibit mudding in certain areas, like on state and federally owned land, as well as laws against dangerous driving in general. Here's a look at some potential legal consequences of mudding:
• Careless or reckless driving citations. You could be breaking the law by driving carelessly or recklessly. The same is true if you drive carelessly on a highway or in the backcountry. Since mudding can be an inherently risky activity, you may be cited for reckless driving.

• Monetary fines. State and federal laws may provide fines for mudding on their land. For example, you face a potential $5,000 fine for mudding on federal property.

• Trespassing charges. Unless you are mudding on your own land, or have the permission of the landowner, you could get busted for trespassing if you decide to take your vehicle onto someone else's property. And if you cause any property damage or destruction, you could also be slapped with a lawsuit to pay for the damage caused.

• Personal injury and wrongful death lawsuits. As seen in the case of Shain Gandee, mudding can have tragic results. Mudding can lead to broken bones, concussions, and other injuries that come with a vehicle crashing through mud. If this has happened to you, an experienced lawyer may be able to help you get compensation.
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Mudding
... is illegal, and it is destroying your backyard.
What is mudding?

Mudding is when you drive through wet meadows, fields, streams, lakeshores and lakebeds...

... spinning tires to throw mud, ripping up the vegetation and creating deep mud holes -- with the goal of testing the rig's power and getting as muddy as possible....
What's wrong with mudding?
Mudding rips up native plants.
• When plants are gone, there is nothing to stop soil from washing into nearby streams and lakes. Muddy streams and lakes are bad for fish, wildlife, recreationists, and towns dependent upon water and tourism for survival.
• When native plants are gone, noxious weeds move in. A meadow of native grasses and flowers may soon become a field of thistles and knapweed.
Mudding compacts soil.
• Healthy soil should bounce a bit when you walk on it. Tire tracks create hard, dried up soil. This hard soil doesn't allow water to move into the ground. Instead, water runs down tire tracks and into creeks and lakes, bringing mud and pollutants with it.
• It is hard for plants to grow in compacted soil -- imagine trying to extend your legs through a concrete floor.
Mudding smothers fish.
• Salmon and trout need cold streams with gravel and cover to build their nests and bury their eggs. Young fish grow up in between the gravel, safe from predators. Driving through streams destroys gravel areas, and can smother young fish.
Mudding harms wildlife.
• Meadows and wetlands provide important breeding, rearing, and foraging habitats for many birds and other animals. When vehicles tear up these areas, they remove nesting and hiding cover, decrease available forage, interfere with feeding, and push animals out into areas where they may not survive. The damage affects wildlife from the largest elk to the smallest shrew, and from bald eagles to hummingbirds.
Mudding is expensive.
• The repair work for just one site can cost thousands of dollars. Multiply that by the number of impacted meadows across the country, and you can see that the cost to taxpayers is immense. Each year, managers of public lands must spend time and money repairing roads damaged by illegal early season drivers.
Mudding is unsightly and ruins favorite recreation sites.
Mudding is also driving on roads that have not yet dried up from rain and snowmelt.

What happens if you are caught mudding?
• Under 36 Code of Federal Regulations 261.13, section h: "It is prohibited to operate any vehicle off Forest Development, State or County roads... in a manner which damages or unreasonably disturbs the land, wildlife, or vegetative resources."
• You could be fined up to $5000. In addition, the U.S. Forest Service may bring a civil suit against you to pay for the costly restoration.
What can you do to help?
• Recognize that mud on a truck often means damaged habitat and the need for repairs that will be costly to all taxpayers.
• Tell your friends, neighbors, family members and classmates that you don't appreciate them destroying your public land.
• Seek out areas where the use of off road vehicles is permitted, and get involved with the groups that maintain those areas. Make sure you are using the right trail for your vehicle-there are signs posted at the trailheads.
• When you see mudding activity, call local law enforcement authorities.

Alerts & Warnings
• Prescribed burns take place this Fall
• Fire Related Closures: Roads, Campgrounds, Trails
• Helicopter logging continues in Oakridge
• Lawler trail temporarily closed
• Detroit Flats Day Use Area Closed July 26-November 21
• Trail Bridge, Lakes End Campgrounds and Smith Reservoir Closed Through 2021
View All Forest Alerts

Related Links
• Find out how OHV rule changes in Oregon affect you at www.oregonOHV.org

Forest Service Home | USDA.gov | recreation.gov | USA.gov | Whitehouse.gov
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_________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chapter 14: Additional Safety Tips Texas Driver Handbook

During a traffic stop, the driver and any passengers are subjected to an investigative detention, which may only last for a reasonable amount of time. Passengers can ask the officer if they are free to leave and do so if the officer agrees. Law enforcement may ask questions during this time. You cannot be punished for refusing to answer questions; however, drivers are required by law to display a driver license when requested by an officer. If you are lawfully detained or arrested, you are also required to give your name, residence address, and date of birth. A driver or a passenger who gives law enforcement a false or fraudulent identity or false answers may be arrested. It may be to your benefit to speak to law enforcement, such as to convey the reason you may have an emergency or for the driver to provide the officer your name address and date of birth if you do not have your driver license with you. Law enforcement may also ask for consent to search your vehicle or person. You may grant or deny the request to search; however, if an officer has probable cause to believe that your vehicle contains evidence of a crime, it can be searched without your consent. If an officer reasonably believes that you have a weapon, the officer can conduct a pat down search of your person and the immediate area around you, including areas of your vehicle. It is unlawful to physically resist a search, but you have the right to notify the officer that you do not consent to any search. Complaints or Concerns If you believe an officer has acted inappropriately during a traffic stop or other encounter, you should report that conduct to the officer’s superiors and follow agency guidelines for submitting complaints against officers as soon as possible. Officers will normally provide their names and badge numbers on request, when practical. Due to the overlapping of jurisdictions, drivers should make sure they identify the correct agency as well as any identifying aspects of the officer and law enforcement vehicle. Drivers should refrain from arguing the validity of a charge during the traffic stop or detention. Signing a citation is not admitting guilt. It simply confirms your promise to pay the fine or contact the court. If you do not agree with the charge brought against you and wish to contest it, you should argue your case before a judge or request a jury trial and acquire the services of an attorney to represent you. False Identification Offense A person commits an offense if he/she gives a false or fictitious name to a law enforcement officer who has lawfully arrested or detained the person. Evading arrest or detention A person commits an offense if he intentionally flees from a person he knows is a peace officer or federal special investigator attempting to lawfully arrest or detain him. You will be subject to higher penalties if you use a vehicle or watercraft while evading arrest or cause injury to another person.

Road Rage---- Each year, road rage, also referred to as aggressive driving,------- causes hundreds of injuries and deaths. Aggressive driving occurs when a driver becomes angry or irritated and as a result, fails to follow the rules of the road. An aggressive driver will intentionally aggravate or attempt to aggravate other drivers and in some cases cause bodily injury, property damage, or death to others.

Tips to Avoid Road Rage
1. Plan your trip or schedule in advance. Allow extra time in case your vehicle breaks down or you encounter traffic congestion due to a crash, road construction, or rush-hour traffic.
2. When caught in traffic do not get angry. Try to relax and listen to music you enjoy. Remember, traffic congestion is usually temporary and you will soon be on your way.
3. Should you need to use the horn, tap the horn; do not hold down the horn. Do not confront other drivers or make obscene gestures.
4. Do not cut into another driver’s lane of traffic. Properly signal your intentions to change lanes and change lanes when it is safe to do so. Turn your turn signal off after you complete your lane change.
5. Do not intentionally slow down, slam on your brakes, or speed up to keep someone from passing or entering your lane of travel.
6. Do not tailgate; follow at a safe distance.
7. Always remember to drive friendly and report aggressive driving to the local authorities.
_____________________________________________________________________

Mud bogging (also known as mud racing, mud running, mud drags, or mudding) is a form of off-road motorsport popular in Canada and the United States in which the goal is to drive a vehicle through a pit of mud or a track of a set length. Winners are determined by the distance traveled through the pit. However, if several vehicles are able to travel the entire length, the time taken to traverse the pit will determine the winner. Typically, vehicles competing in mud bogs are four-wheel drives. The motor sport is overseen by sanctioning bodies like the American Mud Racing Association,[1] and the National Mud Racing Organization (NMRO),[2] that oversee each class, develop and maintain the relationship with track owners to provide a racer and fan-friendly facility, ensure the sponsors get a good return, and help govern the sport.

Extensive Definition
Mud bogging, also known as mud racing, mud running and mud drags, is a form of off-road motorsport popular in Canada and the United States in which the goal is to drive a vehicle through a pit of mud of a set length. Winners are determined by the distance traveled through the pit or, if several vehicles are able to travel the entire length, the time taken to traverse the pit. Typically, vehicles competing in mud bogs are four-wheel drives.

The recent death of MTV's "Buckwild" star Shain Gandee has thrust "mudding" into the spotlight. Many people are now wondering just what is mudding and whether mudding is legal.Generally, mudding involves driving an all-terrain vehicle or sport utility vehicle off-road through wet fields, streams, lakeshores, lakebeds, or other muddy areas, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Individuals who go mudding generally race through these areas, spinning their tires and throwing mud.In the process, they also may rip up vegetation, create unsightly holes, and destroy property. So is mudding legal?Generally speaking, mudding is not illegal in and of itself. For example, there are no laws that provide that someone shall never drive in a muddy area.However, there are laws and regulations that prohibit mudding in certain areas, like on state and federally owned land, as well as laws against dangerous driving in general. Here's a look at some potential legal consequences of mudding:Careless or reckless driving citations. You could be breaking the law by driving carelessly or recklessly. The same is true if you drive carelessly on a highway or in the backcountry. Since mudding can be an inherently risky activity, you may be cited for reckless driving
• Careless or reckless driving citations. You could be breaking the law by driving carelessly or recklessly. The same is true if you drive carelessly on a highway or in the backcountry. Since mudding can be an inherently risky activity, you may be cited for reckless driving.
• Monetary fines. State and federal laws may provide fines for mudding on their land. For example, you face a potential $5,000 fine for mudding on federal property.
• Trespassing charges. Unless you are mudding on your own land, or have the permission of the landowner, you could get busted for trespassing if you decide to take your vehicle onto someone else's property. And if you cause any property damage or destruction, you could also be slapped with a lawsuit to pay for the damage caused.Personal injury and wrongful death lawsuits. As seen in the case of Shain Gandee, mudding can have tragic results. Mudding can lead to broken bones, concussions, and other injuries that come with a vehicle crashing through mud. If this has happened to you, an experienced lawyer may be able to help you get compensation.
General it is legal but if you mess up some ones property(damage) then there is a crime involved ??????????

must pass all safety rules and be safe to put on a show and not hurt the crowd.
Current American National Mud Racing Organization (NMRO) recognized classes are listed below.
History
Mud bogging is a common off-road activity which led to being an organized competition. In the 1970s, organized mud bogs first became popular, as four wheel drive vehicles in general became more popular. Most mud bogs took place at county fairs alongside tractor pulls. By the 1980s, promoters like the USHRA and USA Motorsports began building mud pits in arenas and stadiums, increasing the exposure of the sport. TNT Motorsports also had mud racing for a while, but it was withdrawn.
The National Mud Racing Association was formed in the 1989 to create a standard rule set and form a national championship. This championship is the top honor in mud racing. From 1988-1996, the USHRA and USA Motorsports also held mud racing championships for Class V vehicles, with the USHRA championship usually garnering more exposure (during NMRO races shown on Trucks and Tractor Power on TNN, Army Armstrong would refer to the USHRA champion as the "Indoor series champion"). Today the NMRO is the only national championship for mud racing.
Due to many mud bogs being held in conjunction with monster truck events, several former mud boggers became well known monster truck drivers, including Tony Farrell, Paul Shafer, and Tom Meents. Dennis Anderson's first Grave Digger was also a mud bogger. Mud racers have also moved into the IHRA ranks. Mike Comella, former driver of Bonkers, now runs an IHRA funny car, and Steve Bareman, former driver of Chemical Reaction, now drives for Jim Oddy's Pro Mod team. Dave Ray, former driver of the Midnight Magic vehicle, now drives an NHRA Alcohol Funny Car.
In March of 2007 Mud Truck Television was created in Arkansas. The show is broadcast on several cable systems in the U.S. and also on the internet. Mud Truck Television features local races from Arkansas and all over the United States.

Mud bogging
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"Mudding" redirects here. For the online text-based games, see MUD.
"Mud run" redirects here. For the stream in Pennsylvania, see Mud Run (Green Creek).
Mud bogging (also known as mud racing, mud running, mud drags, or mudding) is a form of off-road motorsport popular in Canada and the United States in which the goal is to drive a vehicle through a pit of mud or a track of a set length. Winners are determined by the distance traveled through the pit. However, if several vehicles are able to travel the entire length, the time taken to traverse the pit will determine the winner. Typically, vehicles competing in mud bogs are four-wheel drives. The motor sport is overseen by sanctioning bodies like the American Mud Racing Association,[1] and the National Mud Racing Organization (NMRO),[2] that oversee each class, develop and maintain the relationship with track owners to provide a racer and fan-friendly facility, ensure the sponsors get a good return, and help govern the sport.

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